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Archive, library, and museum will be accessible again

 

Archive, library, and museum will be reopened from Monday, 8 June 2020 at their usual opening hours. Due to the legal requirements (corona virus), the number of places in the reading room is limited and therefore confirmed registration is required:

Archive: rene.bienert@vwi.ac.at
Library: barbara.grzelak@vwi.ac.at

 

Up to four persons at the same time are allowed to visit the Museum.

 

The safety is our top priority.
We kindly ask you to bring your own mouth and nose mask and wear it during your stay.
Hand disinfectants are available at our locations.

Events

 

The Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI) organises academic events in order to provide the broader public as well as an expert audience with regular insights into the most recent research results in the fields of Holocaust, genocide, and racism research. These events, some of which extend beyond academia in the stricter sense, take on different formats ranging from small lectures to the larger Simon Wiesenthal Lectures and from workshops addressing an expert audience to larger international conferences and the Simon Wiesenthal Conferences. This reflects the institute’s wide range of activities.

 

The range of events further extends to the presentation of selected new publications on the institute’s topics of interest, interventions in the public space, the film series VWI Visuals, and the fellows’ expert colloquia.

 

 

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VWI invites/goes to...
Katherine A. Lebow: "Human, Living Document!" – Polish Sociological Traditions and the Jewish Historical Commissions in Poland, 1944-49
   

Thursday, 6. March 2014, 12:00 - 14:30

Seminarraum 1, Institut für Zeitgeschichte der Universität Wien Spitalgasse 2-4/Hof 1, 1090 Wien

 

VWI goes to the University of Vienna

 

One of the most remarkable responses by Holocaust survivors to the Shoah was the urge to collect testimony. Almost as soon as the Nazi threat had passed, survivors in cities and camps across Europe formed historical commissions whose central mandate was to gather eye-witness accounts of Jewish suffering and persecution. And yet, the urgency with which some survivors pursued this testimonial project, as valuable and obvious as it may seem today, was neither inevitable nor universal. The fact that Polish Jews, for example, were at the forefront of such efforts in the mid- to late-1940s should be understood as a reflection of particular circumstances that included the intellectual and cultural legacies of the Polish Second Republic (1918-1939). This lecture will explore how pre-war Polish sociological traditions, on the one hand, and a public discourse of "social memoir," on the other, left an enduring imprint on Polish Jewish survivors, shaping the methods and assumptions with which historical commissions approached the meaning and practice of testimony.


Moderation and comments by Johanna Gehmacher

 

Katherine A. Lebow is Research Fellow at the VWI.

 

Johanna Gehmacher is Head of the Department of Contemporary History at the University of Vienna.

 

In cooperation with: 

 

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The Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI) is funded by:

 

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