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Archive, library, and museum will be accessible again

 

Archive, library, and museum will be reopened from Monday, 8 June 2020 at their usual opening hours. Due to the legal requirements (corona virus), the number of places in the reading room is limited and therefore confirmed registration is required:

Archive: rene.bienert@vwi.ac.at
Library: barbara.grzelak@vwi.ac.at

 

Up to four persons at the same time are allowed to visit the Museum.

 

The safety is our top priority.
We kindly ask you to bring your own mouth and nose mask and wear it during your stay.
Hand disinfectants are available at our locations.

Events

 

The Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI) organises academic events in order to provide the broader public as well as an expert audience with regular insights into the most recent research results in the fields of Holocaust, genocide, and racism research. These events, some of which extend beyond academia in the stricter sense, take on different formats ranging from small lectures to the larger Simon Wiesenthal Lectures and from workshops addressing an expert audience to larger international conferences and the Simon Wiesenthal Conferences. This reflects the institute’s wide range of activities.

 

The range of events further extends to the presentation of selected new publications on the institute’s topics of interest, interventions in the public space, the film series VWI Visuals, and the fellows’ expert colloquia.

 

 

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VWI invites/goes to...
Raul Cârstocea: Negotiating Modernity: The Anti-Semitism of Interwar Romanian Intellectuals
   

Wednesday, 5. December 2012, 14:00 - 15:30

Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen Bibliothek 1090 Wien Spittelauer Lände 3

 

VWI goes to IWM

 

With the creation of the new state in the 19th century, in a late modernising Romania with many of its traditional social structures still intact, the interplay between tradition and modernity became the focus of the discussions regarding possible patterns of development. The role of the Romanian Jewish community in the intellectual debates on the modernisation of the country is particularly interesting. The Jewish minority was predominantly urban, and more literate and skilled than the majority population. At the same time it was perceived by the Romanian majority as a competing group that had preserved its solid community bonds and was much more united along national lines. The issue of the Jewish minority was inextricably linked with the discussion surrounding the process of nation-building.

Raul Cârstocea’s presentation will address the role of the Jewish community in Romania in the debates on modernisation, as well as the issue of the virtual ‘anti-Semitic consensus’ encountered among Romanian intellectuals in the interwar period. He will argue that, in line with the aforementioned debates and different from the situation in Nazi Germany, the case of Romania shows a form of prejudice that was not primarily grounded on racial considerations but rather on cultural and religious ones, while - as later evidenced in the Romanian Holocaust - being equally radical and destructive.

 

Comments by Florin Faje

 

Raul Cârstocea is a Research Fellow at the Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies.

Florian Faje is a Visiting Fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences.

 

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The Vienna Wiesenthal Institute for Holocaust Studies (VWI) is funded by:

 

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